titankoretech:

cryptfly:

asperqueer:

asksecularwitch:

greatmoustachesploosh:

foxinu:

nsfwjynx:

the-pink-mist:

There was a split second there where his like, “wait, what? bro what are you doing?” 

On more serious note, PTSD dogs for veterans are so fucking therapeutic. They’re like the one person you can spill your guts to and never worry about ever being judged or have that secret divulged. There are times when I definitely prefer the company of a dog over a human. 

Therapy animals save lives.

These dogs are even still so much more amazing. They check rooms before their handler enters, so they can clear it to help the person feel safe. Like in the gif, they are there when panic attacks or nightmares occur, to be something for the person to help ground themselves on, or yes just to turn on the lights. Even more amazing, many people are able to reduce their medication when they have a PTSD service dog there to help them. These dogs are useful for not just veterans, but also victims of abuse, accident trauma, natural disasters, and others. Their training allows them to be useful in situations where medical assistance is needed, as well. Some PTSD dogs are trained to recognize repetitive behaviours in handlers, and signal the handler to break the repetition and stopping the behaviour and possibly injury. 

Service dogs in general are just awesome. Remember to respect any that you see out in public. They are not there for you to walk up to and play with, even the puppies!

I was reading an article of a service dog helping a person with schizophrenia. she stated that when she was seeing or hearing things and notices the dog is not reacting in any way, then she is able to ground herself, realizing what she was experiencing was not real and could work through it easier and is more able to ignore the delusions. And she pointed out she feels more comfortable with a service dog as well because well, dogs don’t judge and get angry for things like this

I teared up about this whole post to be honest.

i’ll never not reblog this post. it is so important.

I cried a little about this

Service animals are amazing and any place that tries to throw out someone with one should be boycotted into bankruptcy. 

(Source: 4gifs)

jaredleto:

“I LIKE TO EMPLOY THE POWER OF NO”: JARED LETO

MORE FROM THE SINGER-ACTOR-INVESTOR ON HOW HIS PERSONAL MISSION GOVERNS HIS PROFESSIONAL LIFE.
BY ROBERT SAFIAN
Jared Leto is backstage at a major concert venue in Romania just a few hours before his band, Thirty Seconds to Mars, will headline for throngs of ecstatic fans. Leto could be boasting about the group’s triumphant growth over the past decade, from minor opening act to bona fide phenomenon. (Two days before, the group packed a venue in Hungary, and tomorrow it will be Bulgaria, part of a worldwide tour that will extend from South America to South Africa.) Leto could be harping on his Academy Award earlier this year for his role in the movie Dallas Buyers Club. Instead, though, he is talking about enterprise software.
Yep, Leto is a tech geek. “We use Slack, Basecamp, Box,” he says, noting some of the tools that his team uses to communicate while he’s touring. “Sometimes we suggest, hey we really want this feature. Being deeply immersed in tech is an awesome doorway.”
Leto is not just a pretty face, though his pretty face has been getting him noticed since he starred as Jordan Catalano in theABC sitcom My So-Called Life in the 1990s. He is thoughtful, insightful, often private despite his regular engagement with some 2 million Twitter followers. He is also more than just a talker when it comes to tech. He’s invested in startups like Nest and Airbnb and Spotify, and he operates his own streaming video-platform, called Vyrt, as well as a social- and digital-media marketing outfit called The Hive. All this along with touring, recording albums, acting, directing films (his documentary Artifact won a People’s Choice award at the Toronto Film Festival). So is he an actor, a musician, an entrepreneur? “I’m a poly-hyphenated whatever,” he says. “I enjoy the stimulation of learning.”
What Leto has embraced is that he can’t engage in all these activities without discipline. “I never wanted to make the most movies, to make the most albums,” he explains. “So I like to employ the power of no. We all want to say yes, because with yes comes so much opportunity, but with the power of no comes focus and engagement.”
Leto doesn’t use the word “mission,” but the filter he applies sounds like one: “I am an artist. I make things and I share things with the world, and hopefully that adds to the quality of people’s lives.” His decisions as an entrepreneur, he says, “come from the same place. I don’t compartmentalize. What you’re doing, you should be passionate about, and if not, then say no.”
Leto turns almost philosophical in explaining why focus is so important in today’s world. “In my youth, listening to music was the dominant activity, in terms of consuming content. It captured my attention. Sometimes there was the smoking of a joint, but it was about listening intently, active participation. Today music can be secondary, it’s background, a lubricant to other experiences. It’s all because our ability to access music is now mobile. Music can be more a part of our lives, but in a more transient way. The same is true for movies. People will watch TV or movies, and they’ve got their phones out, texting, not solely engaged.” His larger point is that valuable interactions require higher engagement. It’s what he strives for with his fans (and one reason he loves live performances); it’s what he strives for in his films and other artistic ventures. It’s also what he’s after with his business activities: real impact that matters.
“I’ve had a standing rule for a couple years: no new projects. With Vyrt, we’ve been listening and learning, creating social theater that gives artists a way to share with the world without relying on advertising, and we’re climbing up the right areas, making progress. There can be attention on service.”
“Whatever you do, you have to have deep interest and desire and passion, or you shouldn’t be doing it. My work is never a job. My work is my life. If you work your fucking ass off, you can get a lot done.”

jaredleto:

“I LIKE TO EMPLOY THE POWER OF NO”: JARED LETO

MORE FROM THE SINGER-ACTOR-INVESTOR ON HOW HIS PERSONAL MISSION GOVERNS HIS PROFESSIONAL LIFE.
BY ROBERT SAFIAN
Jared Leto is backstage at a major concert venue in Romania just a few hours before his band, Thirty Seconds to Mars, will headline for throngs of ecstatic fans. Leto could be boasting about the group’s triumphant growth over the past decade, from minor opening act to bona fide phenomenon. (Two days before, the group packed a venue in Hungary, and tomorrow it will be Bulgaria, part of a worldwide tour that will extend from South America to South Africa.) Leto could be harping on his Academy Award earlier this year for his role in the movie Dallas Buyers Club. Instead, though, he is talking about enterprise software.
Yep, Leto is a tech geek. “We use Slack, Basecamp, Box,” he says, noting some of the tools that his team uses to communicate while he’s touring. “Sometimes we suggest, hey we really want this feature. Being deeply immersed in tech is an awesome doorway.”
Leto is not just a pretty face, though his pretty face has been getting him noticed since he starred as Jordan Catalano in theABC sitcom My So-Called Life in the 1990s. He is thoughtful, insightful, often private despite his regular engagement with some 2 million Twitter followers. He is also more than just a talker when it comes to tech. He’s invested in startups like Nest and Airbnb and Spotify, and he operates his own streaming video-platform, called Vyrt, as well as a social- and digital-media marketing outfit called The Hive. All this along with touring, recording albums, acting, directing films (his documentary Artifact won a People’s Choice award at the Toronto Film Festival). So is he an actor, a musician, an entrepreneur? “I’m a poly-hyphenated whatever,” he says. “I enjoy the stimulation of learning.”
What Leto has embraced is that he can’t engage in all these activities without discipline. “I never wanted to make the most movies, to make the most albums,” he explains. “So I like to employ the power of no. We all want to say yes, because with yes comes so much opportunity, but with the power of no comes focus and engagement.”
Leto doesn’t use the word “mission,” but the filter he applies sounds like one: “I am an artist. I make things and I share things with the world, and hopefully that adds to the quality of people’s lives.” His decisions as an entrepreneur, he says, “come from the same place. I don’t compartmentalize. What you’re doing, you should be passionate about, and if not, then say no.”
Leto turns almost philosophical in explaining why focus is so important in today’s world. “In my youth, listening to music was the dominant activity, in terms of consuming content. It captured my attention. Sometimes there was the smoking of a joint, but it was about listening intently, active participation. Today music can be secondary, it’s background, a lubricant to other experiences. It’s all because our ability to access music is now mobile. Music can be more a part of our lives, but in a more transient way. The same is true for movies. People will watch TV or movies, and they’ve got their phones out, texting, not solely engaged.” His larger point is that valuable interactions require higher engagement. It’s what he strives for with his fans (and one reason he loves live performances); it’s what he strives for in his films and other artistic ventures. It’s also what he’s after with his business activities: real impact that matters.
“I’ve had a standing rule for a couple years: no new projects. With Vyrt, we’ve been listening and learning, creating social theater that gives artists a way to share with the world without relying on advertising, and we’re climbing up the right areas, making progress. There can be attention on service.”
“Whatever you do, you have to have deep interest and desire and passion, or you shouldn’t be doing it. My work is never a job. My work is my life. If you work your fucking ass off, you can get a lot done.”

jaredleto:

“I LIKE TO EMPLOY THE POWER OF NO”: JARED LETO

MORE FROM THE SINGER-ACTOR-INVESTOR ON HOW HIS PERSONAL MISSION GOVERNS HIS PROFESSIONAL LIFE.

BY 

Jared Leto is backstage at a major concert venue in Romania just a few hours before his band, Thirty Seconds to Mars, will headline for throngs of ecstatic fans. Leto could be boasting about the group’s triumphant growth over the past decade, from minor opening act to bona fide phenomenon. (Two days before, the group packed a venue in Hungary, and tomorrow it will be Bulgaria, part of a worldwide tour that will extend from South America to South Africa.) Leto could be harping on his Academy Award earlier this year for his role in the movie Dallas Buyers Club. Instead, though, he is talking about enterprise software.

Yep, Leto is a tech geek. “We use Slack, Basecamp, Box,” he says, noting some of the tools that his team uses to communicate while he’s touring. “Sometimes we suggest, hey we really want this feature. Being deeply immersed in tech is an awesome doorway.”

Leto is not just a pretty face, though his pretty face has been getting him noticed since he starred as Jordan Catalano in theABC sitcom My So-Called Life in the 1990s. He is thoughtful, insightful, often private despite his regular engagement with some 2 million Twitter followers. He is also more than just a talker when it comes to tech. He’s invested in startups like Nest and Airbnb and Spotify, and he operates his own streaming video-platform, called Vyrt, as well as a social- and digital-media marketing outfit called The Hive. All this along with touring, recording albums, acting, directing films (his documentary Artifact won a People’s Choice award at the Toronto Film Festival). So is he an actor, a musician, an entrepreneur? “I’m a poly-hyphenated whatever,” he says. “I enjoy the stimulation of learning.”

What Leto has embraced is that he can’t engage in all these activities without discipline. “I never wanted to make the most movies, to make the most albums,” he explains. “So I like to employ the power of no. We all want to say yes, because with yes comes so much opportunity, but with the power of no comes focus and engagement.”

Leto doesn’t use the word “mission,” but the filter he applies sounds like one: “I am an artist. I make things and I share things with the world, and hopefully that adds to the quality of people’s lives.” His decisions as an entrepreneur, he says, “come from the same place. I don’t compartmentalize. What you’re doing, you should be passionate about, and if not, then say no.”

Leto turns almost philosophical in explaining why focus is so important in today’s world. “In my youth, listening to music was the dominant activity, in terms of consuming content. It captured my attention. Sometimes there was the smoking of a joint, but it was about listening intently, active participation. Today music can be secondary, it’s background, a lubricant to other experiences. It’s all because our ability to access music is now mobile. Music can be more a part of our lives, but in a more transient way. The same is true for movies. People will watch TV or movies, and they’ve got their phones out, texting, not solely engaged.” His larger point is that valuable interactions require higher engagement. It’s what he strives for with his fans (and one reason he loves live performances); it’s what he strives for in his films and other artistic ventures. It’s also what he’s after with his business activities: real impact that matters.

“I’ve had a standing rule for a couple years: no new projects. With Vyrt, we’ve been listening and learning, creating social theater that gives artists a way to share with the world without relying on advertising, and we’re climbing up the right areas, making progress. There can be attention on service.”

“Whatever you do, you have to have deep interest and desire and passion, or you shouldn’t be doing it. My work is never a job. My work is my life. If you work your fucking ass off, you can get a lot done.”

mister-nobody:

blastedheath: Tim Storrier (Australian, b. 1949), Interior Water. Acrylic on canvas, 122 x 198.5 cm.

miss-sazabi:

ani-plamo:

dbvictoria:

Temporary tattoos could make electronic telepathy and telekinesis possible
 Temporary electronic tattoos could soon help people fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones, researchers say. Electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use. 
Commanding machines using the brain is no longer the stuff of science fiction. In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons.
 But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. Instead, Coleman and his team are developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.
"We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun," Coleman says.
The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.
 The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.
Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.
READ MORE



ITS HAPPENING

More like miss-sazabi:

ani-plamo:

dbvictoria:

Temporary tattoos could make electronic telepathy and telekinesis possible
 Temporary electronic tattoos could soon help people fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones, researchers say. Electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use. 
Commanding machines using the brain is no longer the stuff of science fiction. In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons.
 But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. Instead, Coleman and his team are developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.
"We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun," Coleman says.
The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.
 The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.
Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.
READ MORE



ITS HAPPENING

More like

miss-sazabi:

ani-plamo:

dbvictoria:

Temporary tattoos could make electronic telepathy and telekinesis possible

Temporary electronic tattoos could soon help people fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones, researchers say. Electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use.

Commanding machines using the brain is no longer the stuff of science fiction. In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons.

But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. Instead, Coleman and his team are developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.

"We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun," Coleman says.

The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.

The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.

Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.

READ MORE

ITS HAPPENING

More like

thefutureengineer:

Hertha Marks Ayrton

Sources 1 2 3 4 5

jaredleto:

Guru Spencer Greg AKA san-chu-ru (yogi master to the stars) says…#VyRTmarsLinkinPark #ricola #realmenwearheadwraps #pushami #DoOrDie

mythicphilosopher:

dozmuffinxc:

madlori:

always reblog.

just because you are a badass warrior woman who can cut a man in half doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy some goddamned delicate pretty needlework.

YOU GO, GIRL!

Embroidery is not easy to do by hand… Swinging a sword is probably far easier to teach and learn. Or I’m that hopeless… Maybe both.

(Source: katiebishop)

notmattsmith:

nine: don’t wander off

ten: don’t wander off

eleven: don’t wander off

twelve: 

image

(Source: )